The Art of Choosing
Multiple choices which earlier were restricted to examinations only are now a part of our daily lives. Be it for choosing a restaurant to dine or an airline to fly, choices are a plenty to scream and let you know, they are there. In earlier times competition within each segment was less or almost not there. But such is not the case now. The options when you walk into a store in enormous. Almost 30 different brands of detergent within which 20 different SKUs OR there are 60 variety of Jams! Now how would you choose? So with the world surrounded with multiple choices.. are you choosing what YOU want or what the BRAND wants you to choose. Is it good to have a choice or should there be restrictions and limitations. Well, you decide that for your brand.
by Manisha Birla Maheshwari
2 years ago
1
If you can have everything in 57 varieties, making decisions becomes hard work

Choice seduces the modern consumer at every turn. Thanks to a mix of modern medicine, technology and social change, choice has expanded from the grocery shelf to areas that once had few or none. 

THESE are momentous times for the British potato crisp. Little over a generation ago the ...
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2

Sometimes, too much of a good thing is just too much. There's an argument to be made concerning over-assortments of consumer products in one category after the other. What role should the company play when there is just too much for the customer to choose. Read on.

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3

Sheena Iyengar studies how we make choices -- and how we feel about the choices we make. She talks about both trivial choices (Coke v. Pepsi) and profound ones, and shares her groundbreaking research that has uncovered some surprising attitudes about our decisions.

http://www.ted.com Sheena Iyengar studies how we make choices -- and how we feel ...
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Sheena Iyengar, the S. T. Lee Professor of Business at Columbia Business School and author of the award-winning book The Art of Choosing, discusses the buying habits of shoppers faced with a small number of product choices vs. multiple choices.

In this event sponsored by NHK Television in Japan, Sheena Iyengar, the S. T. Lee ...
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Psychologist Barry Schwartz takes aim at a central tenet of western societies: freedom of choice. In Schwartz's estimation, choice has made us not freer but more paralyzed, not happier but more dissatisfied.

http://www.ted.com Psychologist Barry Schwartz takes aim at a central tenet of western ...
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The theory that supermarkets confuse consumers into making wrong purchase choices by bringing out own-label goods with packaging that copies branded products. Opinions from leading experts highlight their opinion whether their 'trend' research matches their experience on ground.

The theory that supermarkets confuse consumers into making wrong purchase choices by bringing out own-label ...
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7

 

A brief study conducted by in 12 countries by 30 individuals across 5 continents has taken over 4 years to conduct this research. The study highlights what the Consumers expects today.

 

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7
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1. You choose
2. Don't Confuse the Customer: Limit Choices, Make More Sales
3. Sheena Iyengar: The art of choosing
4. The Art of Choosing : Case Study on the Jam Problem
5. Barry Schwartz: The paradox of choice
6. What you see is not always what you get
7. Getting In Sync - Ideas for the Consumer Marketing
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